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Pork Adobo in Steamed Bao Buns

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These Pork Adobo in Steamed Bao Buns are just what you need. The recipe is versatile enough to serve at any meal or occasion.    

Last week I shared my recipe for the classic Filipino dish — Instant Pot Pork Adobo with Spinach which we had for dinner. Adobo leftovers are even better a day or two after. By then, the garlic-vinegar flavors would have fully seeped into the tender pork chunks. In the past, I would deep-fry the shreds to a crisp to make Adobo Fried Rice, a two-in-one meal for my kids.

This time, I had steamed bao buns from the Asian market. These are made of flour, yeast and water. The soft, billowy buns are like what is used to make steamed siopao. When we lived in the Philippines, I would make siopao asado buns from scratch. I still do. But life in America is fast-paced and after work or weekends, I don’t always have the time to knead siopao dough from scratch. These pure white, round or square-shaped pre-steamed buns from the Asian grocery are convenient and reasonably-priced. I buy a pack of 12 open-faced bao buns. So, I can fill it up with pork, beef, chicken or vegetables and have a variety of sliders or sandwiches to feed my family.

If you’re serving this for brunch, snacks or a meal, and are expecting company you can cook the Pork Adobo days ahead – either in the Instant Pot or stove-top. Refrigerate or freeze the adobo. The day you’re serving it, shred the adobo into flakes and deep fry them till they sizzle and are crunchy. The tempting garlic-vinegar aromas might tempt you to dive into the skillet and try some. That’s okay. Just leave enough of the crisp, savory pork filling for the fluffy bao bun sliders.

Pork Adobo in Steamed Bao Buns

These Pork Adobo in Steamed Bao Buns are a convenient, easy and delightful way to serve the classic Filipino adobo. The cooked pork adobo is sliced into shreds then deep-fried till they are crisp bits. Fill each pre-steamed, opened-face bao bun with the crunchy adobo flakes and stacks of tomatoes and cucumber. Serve this for brunch, appetizers, snacks, meals or even fill up the lunchboxes with this savory treat. This is an Asian in America recipe by Elizabeth Ann Quirino. Serves 4.
Prep Time40 mins
Cook Time6 mins
Total Time46 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course, Side Dish, Snacks
Cuisine: American, Asian, Chinese, Filipino
Keyword: Pork Adobo Sliders Bao Buns
Servings: 4 people
Calories: 137kcal
Author: Asian in America - Elizabeth Ann Quirino

Equipment

  • Large Skillet

Ingredients

  • 2 cups cooked chicken or pork adobo flakes shredded
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 6 to 8 pieces Chinese steamed bao buns
  • 1 to 2, whole tomatoes sliced, for filling
  • 1 medium-sized cucumber peeled, sliced
  • 2 stalks scallions sliced, for garnish
  • 2 fried eggs for serving (optional)

Instructions

  • Cook the Pork Adobo either in the Instant Pot or stove top. Click here for recipe.
  • Shred cooked pork adobo (or chicken adobo) into flakes. Drain the cooked and shredded meat on paper towels to remove liquid.
  • In a large skillet or wok, over medium-high heat, add the vegetable oil. When oil is hot enough, or an instant-read thermometer shows oil temperature is at 350 F, deep fry the adobo flakes. Cook in batches. The flakes will get crisp in about 3 to 5 minutes. Make sure not to burn the adobo flakes.
  • Using a large turner or spatula, remove the flakes from the skillet or wok. Drain the pork adobo flakes on parchment paper to remove excess oil.
  • Prepare pre-steamed bao buns by placing on a large plate. Place damp paper towels under and over the bao buns. Microwave on High for 1 minute and 30 seconds.
  • Fill each bao bun with slices of cucumbers and tomatoes. Take about 2 tablespoons of the adobo flakes and fill the bao bun, placing the meat on the tomatoes.
  • Garnish with scallion greens. Serve fried eggs on the side if desired.
  • Hello, Friends! All the images and content on this blog are COPYRIGHT PROTECTED and owned by my media company Besa-Quirino LLC. This means BY LAW you are NOT allowed to copy, scrape, lift, frame, plagiarize or use my photos and  recipe content I wrote, on your website,books, films, television shows or videos  without my permission. If you want to republish this recipe or content on another website, video, news article,or media outlets mentioned above please ASK my permission, re-write it in your own words and simply link back to this blog to give proper attribution. It’s the legal thing to do. Thank you. Email me at [email protected]

Nutrition

Serving: 1g | Calories: 137kcal | Carbohydrates: 4g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 11g | Sodium: 5mg | Potassium: 226mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 2g | Vitamin A: 493IU | Vitamin C: 10mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 1mg

Notes on Nutrition: The nutrition information provided is an estimate and will vary based on cooking methods and specific brands of ingredients used.

Copyright Notice: Hello, Friends! Please DO NOT LIFT OR PLAGIARIZE my original recipe, stories, photos or videos. All the images and content on this blog are COPYRIGHT PROTECTED and owned by my media company Besa-Quirino LLC. This means BY LAW you are NOT allowed to copy, scrape, lift, frame, plagiarize or use my photos, essays, stories and recipe content on your websites, books, films, television shows, videos, without my permission. If you wish to republish this recipe or content on media outlets mentioned above, please ASK MY PERMISSION, or re-write it in your own words and link back to my blog AsianInAmericaMag.com to give proper attribution. It is the legal thing to do. Thank you. Email me at [email protected]

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