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Spinach Salad with Salted Eggs and Mangoes

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This Spinach Salad with Salted Eggs and Mangoes  is the perfect side to pair with the barbecues for the 4th of July, and the rest of summer. I used fresh spinach greens for this one. Sometimes, I use water spinach , also known as kangkong to Filipinos. But for this salad, I used a red spinach variety, also called Chinese spinach, or amaranth greens. You can use baby spinach, or any combination of greens you have. Philippine dishes often have combined flavors of  salty and  sweet together in one plate. So, I tried to accomplish that sensation in this spinach salad.

Salted eggs in a Filipino salad are a mainstay. In the Philippines, salted eggs are mostly made of duck’s eggs. I shop for salted eggs in the Asian groceries here in America. They’re mostly chicken eggs. If I have time, I make my own salted eggs, but it takes a couple of weeks.

 When you combine the salty slices with the crisp spinach leaves, tart mangoes, and large salad tomatoes, then the contrasts in flavors and textures are terrific.

Try this spinach side the next time you have Asian entrees on your menu. Mix the sweet honey-like dressing right before you dive into the greens. You will love it and wonder why you didn’t make this before.

Spinach Salad with Salted Eggs and Mangoes

This easy Spinach Salad with Salted Eggs and Mangoes used the red spinach variety, combined with salted eggs, mangoes, and slices of onions. Filipinos often use salted eggs in salads like this one. The dressing is a sweet-savory combination of rice wine, ginger ale, garlic, fresh ginger, honey and seasonings. Pour the dressing at table side. This is an Asian in America recipe by Elizabeth Ann Quirino. Serves 2.
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Appetizer, Salad, Side Dish, Vegetables
Cuisine: American, Asian
Keyword: Spinach Salad with Salted Eggs and Mangoes
Servings: 2 people
Calories: 76kcal
Author: Asian in America - Elizabeth Ann Quirino

Ingredients

For the Salad Dressing:

  • ¼ cup sweet rice wine
  • ¼ cup ginger ale
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 knob (1-inch piece) fresh ginger, peeled, sliced, minced
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 2 Tablespoons honey

For Salad:

  • 3 to 4 cups sliced kangkong (water spinach or red spinach), stems trimmed, and greens cut in 2-inch length
  • 2 whole large salad tomatoes
  • 2 whole salted eggs, peeled, sliced
  • 1 whole large mango, peeled, pitted, sliced in 2-inch length, use fresh Kent variety if available
  • 1 whole medium-sliced red onion, sliced
  • 2 stalks scallion greens, chopped, for garnish

Instructions

To prepare the salad dressing:

  • Mix together in a bowl the sweet rice wine, ginger ale,, garlic, fresh ginger, garlic, salt, black pepper and honey. Blend ingredients well.
    Store in a glass mason jar or container in the refrigerator.

To prepare and serve the salad:

  • In a stockpot of rapidly boiling water, quickly blanch the spinach for 30 seconds (do not blanch longer than this time, leaves wilt). Dip the fresh spinach in a bowl of iced cold water, for 1 minute, so that cooking stops.
    Pat dry the spinach leaves with paper towels.
  • In a large salad bowl, arrange the vegetables: First the spinach at the bottom, then the slices of salad tomatoes, salted egg, and mangoes.
    To serve: Place the salad in individual bowls. Garnish with scallion greens.
    Serve the dressing on the side. Pour the dressing on the salad, at tableside.

Cook's comments:

  • For this salad, you can use kangkong (water spinach), red spinach, or baby spinach. Or a combination of greens you prefer.
    This variety of red spinach is known to be abundant in vitamins and nutrients. When purchasing, look for bright green and red leaves. Use red spinach immediately the same day you bought them. Before blanching, wash the spinach well, to remove dirt or soil.
    Kangkong (water spinach) have dark green leaves. It has firm, long stems. Keep this in the refrigerator, wrapped well in plastic. This should be eaten within 1 to 2 days.
    For mangoes in this recipe: I used the fresh Kent variety, which are known as Indian mangoes to Filipinos. The ones I purchased at the Asian market originated from Florida. On the outside, it has a dark green color and often with a red blush strip over the mango. Inside, it is yellow, with a tender flesh and is slightly fibrous. Flavors are a combination of sweet and somewhat tart. They are large, oval-shaped, and one fruit is enough for this recipe.

Copyright Notice:

  • Notes on Nutrition: The nutrition information provided  in the recipe links is an estimate and will vary based on cooking methods and specific brands of ingredients used.
    Copyright Notice: Hello, Friends! Please DO NOT LIFT OR PLAGIARIZE Asian in America recipes on this blog,  my original recipes, stories, photos or videos. All the images and content on this blog are COPYRIGHT PROTECTED and owned by my media company Besa-Quirino LLC by Elizabeth Ann Quirino. This means BY LAW you are NOT allowed to copy, scrape, lift, frame, plagiarize or use my photos, essays, stories and recipe content on your websites, books, films, television shows, videos, without my permission. If you wish to republish this recipe or content on media outlets mentioned above, please ASK MY PERMISSION, or re-write it in your own words and link back to my blog AsianInAmericaMag.com to give proper attribution. It is the legal thing to do. Thank you. Email me at [email protected]

Nutrition

Serving: 70g | Calories: 76kcal | Carbohydrates: 21g | Protein: 1g | Fat: 1g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 1166mg | Potassium: 25mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 20g | Vitamin A: 5IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 7mg | Iron: 1mg

Notes on Nutrition: The nutrition information provided  in the recipe links is an estimate and will vary based on cooking methods and specific brands of ingredients used.

Copyright Notice: Hello, Friends! Please DO NOT LIFT OR PLAGIARIZE Asian in America recipes on this blog,  my original recipes, stories, photos or videos. All the images and content on this blog are COPYRIGHT PROTECTED and owned by my media company Besa-Quirino LLC by Elizabeth Ann Quirino. This means BY LAW you are NOT allowed to copy, scrape, lift, frame, plagiarize or use my photos, essays, stories and recipe content on your websites, books, films, television shows, videos, without my permission. If you wish to republish this recipe or content on media outlets mentioned above, please ASK MY PERMISSION, or re-write it in your own words and link back to my blog AsianInAmericaMag.com to give proper attribution. It is the legal thing to do. Thank you. Email me at [email protected]

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